Monday, July 6, 2015

Gabbing with authors

Which book have you read that makes you wish you could sit down for a gab fest with the writer, living or dead?

by Meredith Cole

Some books are so wonderful that they stay with you in ways that you can’t describe. You think about the books for days and weeks and even years. The characters haunt you. And you wish the book hadn’t ended when it did, but had gone on and on so you could have continued to enjoy it. Those are the books that make me want to meet the authors and chat. Two authors that I love (and have never met--but would love to!) are Kate Atkinson and Haruki Murakami.

Back when I started writing mysteries, I had no idea such a thing as a mystery convention existed. I’d heard of Science Fiction conventions (after all, they have way better costumes!) but not mystery cons. I went to Crime Bake first, and met Lisa Scottoline (who was so incredibly charming that the next time I met her she acted like she knew who I was). Lisa was and is hilarious and honest in a way that I didn’t realize a writer could be. I went to Malice Domestic, Bouchercon, and the Edgars—and I met more wonderful writers whose books I’d read. Sue Grafton. Laurie King. Laura Lippman. Sara Paretsky. And they were all smart, funny people who were delightful to talk to.

Here’s what I discovered about writers I admire (and also about myself) after having a chance to hang out with quite a few of them. Writers in general are great dinner dates or drinking companions any day of the week. Freed from their cave, they enjoy talking to other people and are some of the smartest folks I’ve ever met. But in the end what they’ve given you in a book is what they’ve given you. And they’ve probably moved on ages ago to their next project. So cornering them for extra insight on a book they wrote years ago will often get you nowhere. Maybe some mumbo jumbo about their process (so and so was a boy before she was a girl), or how much research they did that got left out of the book. If that’s what you’re after, fine. But I suggest finding a group of fellow readers that also enjoys the writer and their books if you want to dig into meaning and share insights. It will probably be way more satisfying.

If you ever have a chance to meet one of your favorite writers, though, be sure to tell them how much you enjoy their books. That, for any writer, will never grow old, and will no doubt inspire a gab fest.

6 comments:

Alan Orloff said...

Great post today, Meredith! I agree about trying to quiz authors about published work--because of the book life cycle, that's ancient news. (I know I've forgotten so much about my earlier work that I'm embarrassed when people ask me about it and I give them a blank look.)

Paul D. Marks said...

Ditto to both you and Alan, Meredith. Everybody moves on and forgets the details I think. But still, you don't have to talk about a specific book with them, you can just enjoy having a few drinks with them and getting to know them on a whole different level.

Meredith Cole said...

Thanks for stopping by Alan and Paul! Specific books are hard to remember. But talking to your favorite authors is definitely very satisfying. BTW, hope you'll both be at Bouchercon in Raleigh...

Alan Orloff said...

I'll be at Bouchercon. Just don't ask me about any of my books.

RJ Harlick said...

Great post, Meredith. I've been struggling to come up with an answer for tomorrow. Maybe a little cut and paste....:)

Susan C Shea said...

But wouldn't it be fun to have dinner with some of these greats and ask them about their lives, passions, and the writers THEY most admire? Good post to start the week, Meredith!