Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Only when absolutely pushed

By R.J. Harlick

Society seems to be more divided than ever, with strong feelings on every side of every issue, and very little middle ground. How do you deal with putting your views out there? Have you ever had to deal with a flame war?

It’s a tricky question. As an author, I am ever mindful of my readership. I don’t want to turn off fans because of my political views. But I suppose given the types of issues I like to explore in my Meg Harris mysteries, I suspect most of my fans share a similar view of the world. 

Nonetheless, I do try to shy away from voicing political views on my social media platforms. I don’t want it to become a platform for divisive argumentation nor do I want it to take away from my main purpose for being on Facebook and Twitter, which funnily enough is to promote me as a writer and my Meg Harris series. 

But that said, there are times, when I feel I can’t keep quiet. Often this is when there is an election happening and I am convinced the winner projected by the polls will do more harm than good once in office.  At other times, it is when the powers that be are planning to implement something that I believe is unfair and blatantly wrong. Lately I’ve been posting articles from established Canadian media about happenings south of the border that affect my own country. I want to give my southern friends an opportunity to read perspectives that come from beyond their borders. What I won’t do is comment on internal happenings of another country no matter how much I dislike what is going on. I believe it is none of my business. 

We are only a few days from the longest day of the year, so I thought I would include a couple of photos taken during my research trip to Canada’s Far North for Arctic Blue Death. They were taken on June 21 at midnight in Pangnirtung, Nunavut, on Baffin Island.  The sun basically drew a circle in the sky. It slipped behind the ridge across the fjord for about an hour before popping up further along the ridge. I don’t think there was a single person asleep in the town. Everyone, including children were out cavorting, enjoying the white night. A magical moment. The building in the foreground of the second photo is the Hudson's Bay Company trading post built in 1921.  



7 comments:

Dietrich Kalteis said...

I agree with you, Robin. it's best to shy away from voicing political views, especially on social media platforms, and I often find these topics a distraction to my writing.

RJ Harlick said...

I see you are up very early, Dietrich. I suspect our reticence is a very Canadian thing. You know how we don't like to ruffle feathers...:)

Susan C Shea said...

I understand your desire to avoid getting caught up in the sturm und drang of politics online ,especially now that it's become so fraught. My problem is I have long subscribed (as my step-father taught and lived) to the idea that to remain silent in the face of injustice is to some extent to support it. Right or wrong, that's in my makeup if not in my DNA! Dietrich, I find it does distract me from my writing these days, alas, alas.

RM Greenaway said...

Distracting and disheartening, yes. I guess some of us reticent Canadians express our views through our fiction, at least by writing between the lines.

RJ Harlick said...

Susan, I fully support what you are doing and agree it's not a time for Americans to keep quiet. I suspect if we were facing the same situation in Canada, I too would be doing all I could to make my voice heard. I wish you much success.

Gagana Vaijayati said...
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Danny Gardner said...

Seems a common theme is to be careful we don't deny another the benefit of our perspective, even if they appear to be hostile to it. That's the nobility of the writer. That's beautiful.